Categories
Social Science

It is essential for mental health workers to understand the influence of externa

It is essential for mental health workers to understand the influence of external factors on family dynamics. This two-part assignment will help you learn this concept. Please complete both parts on the attachment, “Sociological Influences,” to adequately complete this assignment.
Part 1: Complete the chart on the provided attachment, citing two to four scholarly sources throughout the chart. While APA style is not required for the body of Part 1, solid academic writing is expected, and documentation of sources should be presented using APA formatting guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.
Part 2: Use the information in the chart to write a 500–750-word analysis on the same attachment.
Citing two to four scholarly sources, answer the following prompts:
Describe the diverse family system you selected.
Explain the impact of feminism, patriarchy/gender roles, and social class on the family system you selected.
Explain the impact of the economy on the family system: labor, wealth, consumers, etc.
Explain the impact of the state on the family system: laws, regulations, policies, education, etc.
Prepare Part 2 according to the guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. 
This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.
You are required to submit this assignment to LopesWrite. A link to the LopesWrite technical support articles is located in Class Resources if you need assistance. 

Categories
Social Science

Deliverable 3 – Editing and Formatting Microsoft Word Documents Assessments Con

Deliverable 3 – Editing and Formatting Microsoft Word Documents
Assessments Content
CompetencyEvaluate consequence-based moral theories.
InstructionsCreating the perfect bossYour company, Ye Old Paper Mill, recently experienced some organizational chart changes, mostly related to management positions. After posting low profits and even lower employment satisfaction scores, the CEO decided it was time for a change. The CEO, who prefers consequentialist views when it comes to ethical decisions, approached you, along with the rest of the human resources department, and tasked the team with weighing consequentialist ethical theories and selecting which theory would be best for potential managers. For this assessment, you will draft a proposal that addresses the following questions:What are key features of consequentialist theories?
What are the differences between the consequentialist theories?
How does happiness and pleasure factor in to these theories? Remember employee satisfaction is at an all-time low.
What are the pros and cons of each view for the company if the majority of its employees would follow one of the particular theories?
Would it be possible for a manager, who follows a different ethical perspective, to effectively manage subordinates who follow a particular consequentialist theory?
Select and defend which consequentialist theory for management would be best for the company.
Your properly formatted proposal will need to include the following sections:Introduction: Explain why you are sending this proposal. Provide an overview of the issue and discuss the task from the CEO.Address the questions listed above with applicable support and research
Conclusion: In this part, you will wrap up the proposal and select and defend which consequentialist theory for management would be best for the company.
Proper Proposal Formatting: This a professional document and needs to be structured as a proposal and not as an essay. You will still need to supply both in text and full citations for the sources of your information. If you need further assistance with how to structure a proposal, click on this link.

Categories
Social Science

GROUP LEADERSHIP SKILLS Leading a group can be challenging. It is important to r

GROUP LEADERSHIP SKILLS
Leading a group can be challenging. It is important to remember that within the group, the social worker does much more than simply guide a conversation. Skills such as attending, synthesizing thoughts, providing resources, clarifying, and resolving conflict are all used to support process and treatment. The social worker is constantly assessing individual members and the overall group and determining the level of power and influence to exert. Even concrete, organizational actions such as opening and closing a session take skill and finesse.
In this Discussion, you observe a social worker engaging with a group and evaluate their leadership skills based on those described in the course text.
RESOURCES
Be sure to review the Learning Resources before completing this activity.
Click the weekly resources link to access the resources.
WEEKLY RESOURCES
TO PREPARE
Review the Learning Resources on leadership and reflect on the leadership skills required of social workers facilitating groups.
Access the Social Work Case Studies media and navigate to the Levy Family case. Scroll down to the bottom of the page to view the video. This video shows Jake Levy in a group session with fellow veterans.
While watching the video, consider the leadership skills of the social worker facilitating the veterans’ support group.
BY DAY 3
Post your evaluation of the group social worker’s leadership skills in the Levy video, using at least two items from each of the three categories found in the Toseland and Rivas chapter (facilitation of group processes, data gathering and assessment, and action). Suggest another way the social worker might have initiated the group conversation.
BY DAY 6
Respond to at least two colleagues who discussed different leadership skills. Explain the importance of building these skills and how they relate to facilitating the group process.
Use the Learning Resources to support your posts. Make sure to provide APA citations and a reference list.
Response post 1 ( to CN)
Evaluation of the group social worker’s leadership skills in the Levy video.
While working in the group setting, it is important to practice basic leadership skills including facilitation, data gathering and assessment, and action (Toseland & Rivas, 2017). The Levy video displays these leadership skills.
Facilitation
Strong communication skills and communication are necessary to facilitate the group and clarify goals within the group (Toseland & Rivas, 2017). The Levy video demonstrates facilitation when the social worker opens the conversation with clarifying that the members of the group have all served tours of active duty in Iraq or Afghanistan (Walden, 2022). By clarifying this, the social worker is able to communicate the similar situations and clarify that the group will focus on veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan. Additionally, the social worker utilized facilitation in the group setting when she regathered the attention of the group and redirected the attention to the goals of the group rather than allowing the conversation about alcohol to continue between the two group members that were disagreeing and not discussing the topic (Walden, 2022). The social worker in this group setting demonstrated the ability to remain in control and empathetic, while still refocusing the group after off topic conversations began. Facilitation helps to provide understanding to group members (Toseland & Rivas, 2017).
Data gathering and assessment
Data gathering is important in group because it allows the social worker to assess whether the information in group is meaningful and beneficial to the group and helps to develop a plan for communication to meet the goals established (Toseland & Rivas, 2017). During the video, the social worker asked questions regarding drinking habits, and this was an attempt to gather data within the group. Additionally, she asked the group about their feelings while adjusting back to civilian life (Walden, 2022). By gathering this data, the social worker is able to assess the group and ensure that the group goals are being addressed.
Action
Action skills allow the social worker to help the group members accomplish tasks and feel that they are accepted within the group (Toseland & Rivas, 2017). Action skills were demonstrated by the social worker when she provided Jake with the information for Alcoholics Anonymous as well as discussing couples therapy with him. The social worker validated and utilized action skills when she discussed the seriousness of excessive drinking and the risks associated with alcohol use (Walden, 2022). The social worker in the video allowed others to see that sometimes people do things to mask what they are feeling and provided an opportunity for them to see that there is support.
Group Conversation
The leader of the group could have begun the introductions by allowing everyone the opportunity to discuss something about themselves through an introduction of their background. By doing this, it could encourage more active participation between some of the group members that did not speak. I do feel that the way the social worker addressed the conflict between Bill and Jake was effective as she used it as a chance to provide validation and empathy while still redirecting the group back to the goals.
References
Toseland, R. W., & Rivas, R. F. (2017). An introduction to group work practice (8th ed.). Pearson.
Walden University, LLC. (2022). Social work case studies [Interactive media]. Walden University Blackboard. https://class.waldenu.edu
Response post 2 (to AH)
The behaviors or activities that help the group achieve its purpose and tasks, as well as help members, achieve their personal goals, are referred to as group leadership skills. Both the group’s leader and members use combined leadership skills to complete tasks such as problem-solving. Some of the fundamental skills required for group leadership are classified into three categories: facilitating group processes, data collection and analysis, and action (Toseland & Rivas, 2017). After evaluating the group social worker’s leadership skills in the Levy video, the following is what I observed.
Facilitating Group Processes
Skills in the category of facilitating group processes contribute to positive group outcomes (Toseland & Rivas, 2017). I observed the group leader using attending skills by maintaining eye contact with the members and speaking with empathy, respect, warmth, and genuineness. These abilities will be useful in building rapport with the group. They will also foster an atmosphere of acceptance and cohesion among group members (Toseland & Rivas, 2017). I also saw her use her responding skills when she gave Bill a supportive response, saying, “That’s a good point, Bill. We sometimes do things to avoid dealing with unpleasant feelings, such as readjusting to life at home.” This ultimately led to Levy opening up to the group when he said, “My wife’s had enough of me too.” (Walden University, 2022). Responding skills, according to Toesland & Rivas (2017), can elicit specific reactions and encourage members to continue working on a concern. It would be readjusting to life at home in this group.
Data-Gathering and Assessment
Data gathering and assessment skills help to develop a plan for influencing communication patterns as well as in deciding on the action skills to use that will help the group to achieve its purpose (Toseland & Rivas, 2017). The group leader demonstrated the identifying and describing skill right away by stating where they completed their tour of duty and asking them to discuss how they are adjusting. This allows members to elaborate on relevant factors influencing their difficulties adjusting to life back at home. This led to the group engaging in discussing the difficulties they have been experiencing. Another skill I noticed her using was synthesizing when she said, “sometimes we do things to avoid dealing with unpleasant feelings, such as adjusting to life back home.” (Walden University, 2022). This was in response to Bill’s discussion of his problematic drinking. There appeared to be discord between Bill and Levy; I believe this created a link behind Levy’s actions, causing him to engage more seriously and honestly.
Action Skills
Action skills are mostly used by the group leader to help the group accomplish its tasks (Toseland & Rivas, 2017). I observed the group leader engage in action skills by supporting Jake when she told him he made a good point about it sometimes seeming easier to self-medicate rather than face the fears. She was empathetic and non-judgmental toward the members. She also linked the communication between Bill and Levy when she supported Bill’s statement which resulted in Levy engaging openly and honestly.
Another way the Group Leader Could Have Initiated the Group
Another way the group leader could have started the group would have been for each member to go around and introduce themselves to the group, as well as share a little bit about themselves if they wanted to. This, I believe, would have given the group members the opportunity to feel welcomed and involved from the start. It would have given the group leader more insight into the group as well.
Reference
Toesland, R. W., & Rivas, R. F. (2017). An introduction to group work practice. (8th ed.).
Pearson.
LEARNING RESOURCES
Required Readings
Toseland, R. W., & Rivas, R. F. (2017). An introduction to group work practice (8th ed.). Pearson.Chapter 4, “Leadership” (pp. 98–136)
Ezhumalai, S., Muralidhar, D., Dhanasekarapandian R., & Nikketha, B. S. (2018). Group interventions Links to an external site.. Indian Journal of Psychiatry, 60, S514–S521. https://doi.org/10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiat…
Required Media
Walden University, LLC. (2022). Social work case studies Links to an external site.[Interactive media]. Walden University Canvas. https://waldenu.instructure.comNavigate to the Levy Family case. Scroll down to the bottom of the page to view the video.
Group Therapy
Time Estimate: 5-7 minutes
Note: The video below is interactive. Click the play button and use the buttons to navigate through the pieRes

Categories
Social Science

APPLICATION OF GROUP SKILLS While leading a treatment group, you may be faced wi

APPLICATION OF GROUP SKILLS
While leading a treatment group, you may be faced with a dominant member who takes up much of the session time while others fall silent, or someone who is resistant or combative. There may be interpersonal conflict, or a complete lack of engagement. These challenging scenarios require effective leadership skills to balance negativity, empower group members, and build a respectful community. What skills do you currently possess, and how do you see yourself applying them in group work practice?
For this Assignment, you assume the role of a social worker leading a group session in an interactive media piece. You draw on your skills to navigate the scenario and take appropriate action; then, you reflect on your choices and the strengths and opportunities for your leadership skills.
RESOURCES
Be sure to review the Learning Resources before completing this activity.
Click the weekly resources link to access the resources.
WEEKLY RESOURCES
TO PREPARE
Navigate through the Group Therapy media piece in which you act as the social worker leading a group session.Walden University, LLC. (2022). Social work case studies Links to an external site.[Interactive media]. Walden University Canvas. https://waldenu.instructure.comNavigate to the Levy Family case. Scroll down to the bottom of the page to view the video.
Group Therapy
Time Estimate: 5-7 minutesNote: The video below is interactive. Click the play button and use the buttons to navigate through the piece.
Reflect on the choices you selected based on the on-screen guidance and what you would have done differently if you were truly facilitating the group.
Consider your leadership skills in general. Where might you need to improve to be a successful group leader?
BY DAY 7
Submit a 2- to 3- page paper in which you:
Explain the reasoning behind your choices at each step of the video scenario. What leadership skills did you employ and why?
Explain what you would have done differently from the options presented to you and why. Include specific language you would have used (e.g., I would have said “X” to “Y” person in order to…).
Describe how you view your leadership skills at this time. What leadership skills (identified in the Toseland and Rivas text) could you work on to improve?
Use the Learning Resources to support your Assignment. Make sure to provide APA citations and a reference list.

Categories
Social Science

CompetencyUtilize virtue and character-based ethical theories in case studies. I

CompetencyUtilize virtue and character-based ethical theories in case studies.
InstructionsFor this assessment, you will get the chance to highlight your creative writing skills and your knowledge surrounding Aristotle. Be the Best You, is a career coaching and mentorship agency that works with employees to not only achieve their professional goals, but their personal goals as well. By using a virtue and character-based approach. As a coach for Be the Best You, you are part of the training committee that creates new training material for the clientele. The agency is seeking 3 new training sessions related to the golden mean, Aristotelian friendship, and eudemonia. Part of these trainings include scenarios that the clientele read and then answer applicable questions. You will be creating three, fully developed scenarios for the golden mean, Aristotelian friendship, and eudemonia.Your submission, in its final state will include 3 scenarios including 1 for the golden mean, 1 Aristotelian friendship, and 1 for eudemonia. For each scenario, include 3 questions, 9 in total.
Each scenario must include:A fully developed fictional scenario that clearly highlights which of the three (the golden mean, Aristotelian friendship, and eudemonia) is being presented. Clearly define the characters and the actions that are representative of the selected topic.
Three, open-ended questions pertaining to the scenario that the clientele would answer in relation to the facts and the topic of the scenario.

Categories
Social Science

REACTIONS TO DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIORS Many children and adolescents who go to counse

REACTIONS TO DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIORS
Many children and adolescents who go to counseling engage in behaviors that are disruptive to others. These children and adolescents are sometimes labeled as having “externalizing” disorders because they tend to “act out” their symptoms, which causes other people distress. Disorders such as depression and anxiety are “internalizing” disorders because children and adolescents generally internalize their symptoms in a way that causes them distress. When children “act out” their symptoms, adults can become impatient, annoyed, and angry. These responses often intensify when children are unwilling or unable to take personal responsibility for their behavior. As a future child and adolescent clinician, it is important for you to gauge your reactions toward children and adolescents with disruptive behaviors and consider how your reactions may impact the counseling process.
For this Discussion, review each of the clips in the media Disruptive Behaviors Part One and think about your reactions to the behavior exhibited in the media. Select one particular child or adolescent in the media and think about how your reactions to that child’s or adolescent’s behavior might impact a therapeutic relationship with that child or adolescent. Also, consider how you might transform any negative reactions you may have to the child or adolescent you selected to an appropriate therapeutic response.
With these thoughts in mind:
RESOURCES
Be sure to review the Learning Resources before completing this activity.
Click the weekly resources link to access the resources.
WEEKLY RESOURCES
BY DAY 3
Post a brief description of the disruptive behavior you selected, and explain one way your reactions might positively or negatively influence the development of a therapeutic relationship with that child or adolescent. Then, explain one way you might transform a negative reaction into an appropriate therapeutic response and how. Be specific and use examples.
Be sure to support your postings and responses with specific references to the week’s resources.
Read a selection of your colleagues’ postings.
BY DAY 5
Respond to at least one of your colleague’s postings in one or more of the following ways:
Ask a probing question.
Share an insight gained from having read your colleague’s posting.
Offer and support an opinion.
Make a suggestion.
Expand on your colleague’s posting.
Return to this Discussion in a few days to read the responses to your initial posting. Note what you have learned and/or any insights you have gained as a result of your colleagues’ comments.
Response to BL –
Post a brief description of the disruptive behavior you selected and explain one way your reactions might positively or negatively influence the development of a therapeutic relationship with that child or adolescent. Then, explain one way you might transform a negative reaction into an appropriate therapeutic response and how. Be specific and use examples.
The video I chose to describe is the angry adolescent. In this scenario, there is teenage girl who is observed to be angry. The anger was geared towards her parents, causing mis-placed feelings towards her counseling which resulting in her lashing out and yelling during her counseling sessions. “Children with highly disruptive behavior present a heavy burden to the schools, counselors, and others who care for them, and they present difficulties for their peers (Cochran et al., 2010, p. 130). The teenager is resistant to counseling, thinking it is stupid and seems to think there is no point to the counseling; failing to connect/engage with the counselor (Laureate Education, 2014d). In the first video the counselor displayed irritability by the girl’s response. The counselor was chastising and belittling the teenager. I would use the therapeutic approach from the second part of the video because the counselor-initiated patience by acknowledging her personal rights, one being that she does not have to talk to him. He also discussed the policy as far as confidentiality so she would be aware of all policies in procedures in place. While working in this field, I have encountered some teens who were reluctant to be forthcoming with information. I have learned is that you cannot force anyone to disclose their sensitive information.
Transformation to Appropriate Therapeutic Response
My therapeutic approach would be to listen, let them know that it is their right not to talk and as the counselor did in the second video, I would turn the session into a story about myself and tell my own story about different events of my life. Self-disclosure can a method used to help form a sense of trust and rapport with a client. “It often helps others to feel comfortable enough to do the same – forming stronger connections and making work more enjoyable and productive for everyone” (Self-Disclosure: Connecting with Honest, Personal Communication, n.d.). In the first video response, the counselor tells the teen that “she is just being disrespectful” (Laureate Education, 2014d). This response could intensify the teen’s already disruptive and angry behaviors. If respect needed to be addressed, then I would use it to set boundaries. I will always be respectful when speaking to teenagers. The goal is for me as the counselor to have a healthy positive client relationship.
Reference:
Cochran, J. L., Cochran, N. H., Nordling, W. J., McAdam, A., & Miller, D. T. (2010). Two case studies of child-centered play therapy for children referred with highly disruptive behavior.
International Journal of Play Therapy, 19(3), 130–143. https://doi[1]org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/a…
Laureate Education (Producer). (2014d). Disruptive Behaviors: Part One [Interactive Media] Author.
Laureate Education (Producer). (2014e). Disruptive Behaviors: Part Two [Interactive Media] Author.
Resources:
Hamblin, J. (2017, December 11). How spanking affects later relationships Links to an external site.. The Atlantic. Retrieved from https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2017/12…
Taggart, J., Eisen, S., & Lillard, A. S. (2019). The current landscape of US children’s television: Violent, prosocial, educational, and fantastical content Links to an external site.. Journal of Children and Media, 13(3), 276–294. https://go.openathens.net/redirector/waldenu.edu?u…
Klein, B., Damiani-Taraba, G., Koster, A., Campbell, J., & Scholz, C. (2015). Diagnosing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children involved with child protection services: are current diagnostic guidelines acceptable for vulnerable populations? Links to an external site.. Child: care, health and development, 41(2), 178-185.
Powers, C. J., & Bierman, K. L. (2013). The multifaceted impact of peer relations on aggressive-disruptive behavior in early elementary school Links to an external site.. Developmental Psychology, 49(6), 1174–1186.
As you review this article, consider the impact of peer relations on disruptive behavior. Focus on how peer relations contribute to aggressive-disruptive behavior.
Document: DSM-5 Bridge: Disruptive Behaviors (PDF)Download DSM-5 Bridge: Disruptive Behaviors (PDF)
Use this document to guide you through the definition of disruptive behaviors for this week’s Discussion.
Cochran, J. L., Cochran, N. H., Nordling, W. J., McAdam, A., & Miller, D. T. (2010).Two case studies of child-centered play therapy for children referred with highly disruptive behavior Links to an external site.. International Journal of Play Therapy, 19(3), 130–143.
As you review this article, consider how child-centered play therapy, as a therapeutic approach, supports disruptive behavior
Eyberg, S. M., Nelson, M. M., & Boggs, S. R. (2008). Evidence- based psychosocial treatments for children and adolescents with disruptive behavior Links to an external site.. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 37(1), 215–237.
As you review this article, consider the evidence-based psychosocial treatments used for children and adolescents with disruptive behavior. Focus on how clinicians might use these therapeutic approaches in their professional practice.
Pardini, D. A., Frick, P. J., & Moffitt, T. E. (2010). Building an evidence base for DSM-5 conceptualizations of oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder: Introduction to the special section Links to an external site.. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 119(4), 683–688.As you review this article, consider the recommended revisions to the diagnostic criteria for oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD). Focus on this information might inform your professional practice.
Required Media
Walden University, LLC. (Producer). (2014c). Disruptive behaviors [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 20 minutes.
In this media program, Drs. John Sommers-Flanagan and Eliana Gil discuss disruptive behaviors. Focus on how disruptive behaviors can be regulated.
Walden University, LLC. (Producer). (2014d). Disruptive behaviors Links to an external site.: Part one [Interactive media]. Baltimore, MD: Author.
Disruptive Behaviors: Part One Transcript (PDF)Download Disruptive Behaviors: Part One Transcript (PDF)
In this media program, you will analyze four disruptive behaviors in children and adolescents. Focus on your analysis and answering the questions for each disruptive behavior.
Walden University, LLC. (Producer). (2014e).Disruptive behaviors Links to an external site.: Part two [Interactive media]. Baltimore, MD: Author.
Disruptive Behaviors: Part Two Transcript (PDF)Download Disruptive Behaviors: Part Two Transcript (PDF)
In this media program, you will select one counseling session from the same four disruptive behaviors you previously viewed. Focus on the session and answering the questions addressed in the media.