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R​‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‍‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌‌​ead pages 22-46 of our textbook. Annotate the three essay

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R​‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‍‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌‌​ead pages 22-46 of our textbook. Annotate the three essays beginning on page 23 and ending
on page 46. Your notes should include your reactions, responses, and reflections about what you
are reading as you are reading it.
Writing
Write an essay as directed on “A Practice Sequence: Composing a Literacy Narrative” steps 1-5
on pages 47-48 [See the directions below].
We would like you to write your own literacy narrative. The following practice sequence
suggests some strategies for doing so.
1. Reflect on your experiences as a reader. Spend some time jotting down answers to these
questions (not necessarily in this order) or to other related questions that occur to you as
you write.
1. Reflect on your experiences as a reader. Spend some time jotting down answers to these
questions (not necessarily in this order) or to other related questions that occur to you as
you write.
a. Can you recall the time when you first began to read?
b. What are the main types of reading you do? Why?
c. How would you describe or characterize yourself as a reader?
d. Is there one moment or event that encapsulates who you are as a reader?
e. What are your favorite books, authors, and types of books? Why are they
favorites?
f. In what ways has reading changed you for the better? For the worse?
g. What is the most important thing you’ve learned from reading?
h. Have you ever learned something important from reading, only to discover later
that it wasn’t true or sufficient? Explain.
2. Write your literacy narrative, [expand it] focusing on at least one turning point, at least
one moment of recognition or lesson learned. Write no fewer than two pages but no more
than five pages. See where your story arc takes you. What do you conclude about your
own “growing into literacy”?
3. Then start a conversation about literacy. Talk with some other people about their
experiences. You might talk with some classmates—and not necessarily those in your
writing class—about their memories of becoming literate. You might interview some
people you grew up with—a parent, a sibling, a best friend—about their memories of you
as a reader and writer and about their own memories of becoming literate. Compare their
memories to your own. Did you all have s​‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‍‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌‌​imilar experiences? How were they different?
Do you see things the same way? Then write down your impressions and what you think
you may have learned.
4. Recast [reflect on] your literacy narrative, incorporating some of the insights you
gathered from other people. How does your original narrative change? What new things
now have to be accounted for?
5. Can you imagine your own literacy narrative having larger implications for policy
changes? Explain. Do you think what you’ve learned from reading Coates’s, Rodriguez’s,
and Westover’s literacy narratives has implications for what it means to be educated and
how schools can foster a love of learning?
Use your relevant notes to support your narrative wherever it is appropriate to do so, such as the
background information and supporting evidence for your arguments.
Apply MLA formatting and documentation to your essay. You can see how in several documents
and videos in the How to Format and Document Sources in MLA  Style module in Canvas.
Also, paste all your annotations from the three articles after the works cited of your essay.
Grading Rubric: Literacy Narrative Essay
Composition (introduction, thesis, supporting evidence, and conclusions); MLA format,
introductions, and citations; paragraphing and grammar [up to 10] —
A. Reflections on your experiences as a reader. Answers to the 8 questions (not necessarily in
this order) or answers to other questions that occur to you as you write [up to 16] —
B. Focus on at least one moment of recognition or lesson learned. Write no fewer than two pages
but no more than five pages about it [up to 16] —
C. Comparison of memories of others; experiences becoming literate to your own, ending with
your impressions and what you think you may have learned from their experiences [up to 16] —
D. Integration of some the insights you gathered from other people into your own, pointing out
changes. What new ideas now have to be accounted for [thought about]? [up to 16] —
E. Explanations of what you think you’ve learned from reading Coates’s, Rodriguez’s, and
Westover’s literacy narratives and implications; what it means to be educated; and how schools
can foster a love of learning [up to 16] —
Annotations from reading Coate​‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‍‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌‌​s, Rodriguez, and Westover [up to 10] —

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